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yum install rsyslog

 

@=UDP

@@=TCP

 

/etc/rsyslog.conf:

 

# rsyslog configuration file

# For more information see /usr/share/doc/rsyslog-*/rsyslog_conf.html
# If you experience problems, see http://www.rsyslog.com/doc/troubleshoot.html

#### MODULES ####

# The imjournal module bellow is now used as a message source instead of imuxsock.
$ModLoad imuxsock # provides support for local system logging (e.g. via logger command)
$ModLoad imjournal # provides access to the systemd journal
#$ModLoad imklog # reads kernel messages (the same are read from journald)
#$ModLoad immark # provides --MARK-- message capability

# Provides UDP syslog reception
$ModLoad imudp
$UDPServerRun 514

# Provides TCP syslog reception
$ModLoad imtcp
$InputTCPServerRun 514


#### GLOBAL DIRECTIVES ####

# Where to place auxiliary files
$WorkDirectory /var/lib/rsyslog

# Use default timestamp format
$ActionFileDefaultTemplate RSYSLOG_TraditionalFileFormat

# File syncing capability is disabled by default. This feature is usually not required,
# not useful and an extreme performance hit
#$ActionFileEnableSync on

# Include all config files in /etc/rsyslog.d/
$IncludeConfig /etc/rsyslog.d/*.conf

# Turn off message reception via local log socket;
# local messages are retrieved through imjournal now.
$OmitLocalLogging on

# File to store the position in the journal
$IMJournalStateFile imjournal.state

#### TEMPLATES ####
# Template for devices that don't report hostname - omniswitches
$template remoteFormat,"%TIMEGENERATED% %FROMHOST-IP% %FROMHOST% %TIMEREPORTED% %syslogtag%%msg:::sp-if-no-1st-sp%%msg:::drop-last-lf%\n"

#### RULES ####

# Send all debug traps to Nagios
*.debug;mail.none;user.none @192.234.243.65

# Log messages from lab devices to specific file & nowhere else
:fromhost, contains, "lab" /var/log/lab_syslog.log;remoteFormat
& ~

# Log messages from specific device to test log server
:fromhost, contains, "fg1000" @@192.234.243.34;remoteFormat
#& ~


# Log messages from all prod devices to specific file & nowhere else
:fromhost, startswith, "macq" /var/log/syslog.log;remoteFormat
& ~

# Log messages from localhost to standard location
:fromhost, startswith, "srv-script-02" /var/log/messages
& ~

# Log all kernel messages to the console.
# Logging much else clutters up the screen.
#kern.* /dev/console

# Log anything (except mail) of level info or higher.
# Don't log private authentication messages!
*.info;mail.none;authpriv.none;cron.none /var/log/messages

# The authpriv file has restricted access.
authpriv.* /var/log/secure

# Log all the mail messages in one place.
mail.* -/var/log/maillog

# Log cron stuff
cron.* /var/log/cron

# Everybody gets emergency messages
*.emerg :omusrmsg:*

# Save news errors of level crit and higher in a special file.
uucp,news.crit /var/log/spooler

# Save boot messages also to boot.log
local7.* /var/log/boot.log;remoteFormat


# ### begin forwarding rule ###
# The statement between the begin ... end define a SINGLE forwarding
# rule. They belong together, do NOT split them. If you create multiple
# forwarding rules, duplicate the whole block!
# Remote Logging (we use TCP for reliable delivery)
#
# An on-disk queue is created for this action. If the remote host is
# down, messages are spooled to disk and sent when it is up again.
#$ActionQueueFileName fwdRule1 # unique name prefix for spool files
#$ActionQueueMaxDiskSpace 1g # 1gb space limit (use as much as possible)
#$ActionQueueSaveOnShutdown on # save messages to disk on shutdown
#$ActionQueueType LinkedList # run asynchronously
#$ActionResumeRetryCount -1 # infinite retries if host is down
# remote host is: name/ip:port, e.g. 192.168.0.1:514, port optional
#*.* @@remote-host:514
#*.* @@192.234.243.34:514
# ### end of the forwarding rule ###

 

[root@server ~]#firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-port=514/tcp
[root@server ~]#firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-port=514/udp
[root@server ~]#firewall-cmd --reload

 

service rsyslog restart

 

Windows:

w32tm /stripchart /computer:<host name or IP>

Linux:

ntpq -p

 

Step One—Create the RSA Key Pair
The first step is to create the key pair on the client machine (there is a good chance that this will just be your computer):

ssh-keygen -t rsa

Step Two—Store the Keys and Passphrase
Once you have entered the Gen Key command, you will get a few more questions:

Enter file in which to save the key (/home/demo/.ssh/id_rsa):
You can press enter here, saving the file to the user home (in this case, my example user is called demo).

Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase):

The public key is now located in /home/demo/.ssh/id_rsa.pub The private key (identification) is now located in /home/demo/.ssh/id_rsa


Step Three—Copy the Public Key
Once the key pair is generated, it's time to place the public key on the virtual server that we want to use.

You can copy the public key into the new machine's authorized_keys file with the ssh-copy-id command. Make sure to replace the example username and IP address below.

ssh-copy-id This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.92.168.169.1
Alternatively, you can paste in the keys using SSH:

cat ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub | ssh This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.192.168.169.1 "mkdir -p ~/.ssh && cat >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys"

Moving the Cursor

Unlike many of the PC and MacIntosh editors, the mouse does not move the cursor within the vi editor screen (or window). You must use the the key commands listed below. On some UNIX platforms, the arrow keys may be used as well; however, since vi was designed with the Qwerty keyboard (containing no arrow keys) in mind, the arrow keys sometimes produce strange effects in vi and should be avoided.
If you go back and forth between a PC environment and a UNIX environment, you may find that this dissimilarity in methods for cursor movement is the most frustrating difference between the two.


In the table below, the symbol ^ before a letter means that the <Ctrl> key should be held down while the letter key is pressed.
* j or <Return>
[or down-arrow] move cursor down one line
* k [or up-arrow] move cursor up one line
* h or <Backspace>
[or left-arrow] move cursor left one character
* l or <Space>
[or right-arrow] move cursor right one character
* 0 (zero) move cursor to start of current line (the one with the cursor)
* $ move cursor to end of current line
w move cursor to beginning of next word
b move cursor back to beginning of preceding word
:0<Return> or 1G move cursor to first line in file
:n<Return> or nG move cursor to line n
:$<Return> or G move cursor to last line in file

 

Screen Manipulation

The following commands allow the vi editor screen (or window) to move up or down several lines and to be refreshed.
^f move forward one screen
^b move backward one screen
^d move down (forward) one half screen
^u move up (back) one half screen
^l redraws the screen
^r redraws the screen, removing deleted lines

 

Adding, Changing, and Deleting Text

Unlike PC editors, you cannot replace or delete text by highlighting it with the mouse. Instead use the commands in the following tables.
Perhaps the most important command is the one that allows you to back up and undo your last action. Unfortunately, this command acts like a toggle, undoing and redoing your most recent action. You cannot go back more than one step.
* u UNDO WHATEVER YOU JUST DID; a simple toggle
The main purpose of an editor is to create, add, or modify text for a file.

 

Inserting or Adding Text

The following commands allow you to insert and add text. Each of these commands puts the vi editor into insert mode; thus, the <Esc> key must be pressed to terminate the entry of text and to put the vi editor back into command mode.
* i insert text before cursor, until <Esc> hit
I insert text at beginning of current line, until <Esc> hit
* a append text after cursor, until <Esc> hit
A append text to end of current line, until <Esc> hit
* o open and put text in a new line below current line, until <Esc> hit
* O open and put text in a new line above current line, until <Esc> hit

 

Changing Text

The following commands allow you to modify text.
* r replace single character under cursor (no <Esc> needed)
R replace characters, starting with current cursor position, until <Esc> hit
cw change the current word with new text,
starting with the character under cursor, until <Esc> hit
cNw change N words beginning with character under cursor, until <Esc> hit;
e.g., c5w changes 5 words
C change (replace) the characters in the current line, until <Esc> hit
cc change (replace) the entire current line, stopping when <Esc> is hit
Ncc or cNc change (replace) the next N lines, starting with the current line,
stopping when <Esc> is hit

 

Deleting Text

The following commands allow you to delete text.
* x delete single character under cursor
Nx delete N characters, starting with character under cursor
dw delete the single word beginning with character under cursor
dNw delete N words beginning with character under cursor;
e.g., d5w deletes 5 words
D delete the remainder of the line, starting with current cursor position
* dd delete entire current line
Ndd or dNd delete N lines, beginning with the current line;
e.g., 5dd deletes 5 lines

 

Cutting and Pasting Text

The following commands allow you to copy and paste text.
yy copy (yank, cut) the current line into the buffer
Nyy or yNy copy (yank, cut) the next N lines, including the current line, into the buffer
p put (paste) the line(s) in the buffer into the text after the current line
Other Commands

 

Searching Text

A common occurrence in text editing is to replace one word or phase by another. To locate instances of particular sets of characters (or strings), use the following commands.
/string search forward for occurrence of string in text
?string search backward for occurrence of string in text
n move to next occurrence of search string
N move to next occurrence of search string in opposite direction

 

Determining Line Numbers

Being able to determine the line number of the current line or the total number of lines in the file being edited is sometimes useful.
:.= returns line number of current line at bottom of screen
:= returns the total number of lines at bottom of screen
^g provides the current line number, along with the total number of lines,
in the file at the bottom of the screen

 

Saving and Reading Files

These commands permit you to input and output files other than the named file with which you are currently working.

:r filename<Return> read file named filename and insert after current line
(the line with cursor)
:w<Return> write current contents to file named in original vi call
:w newfile<Return> write current contents to a new file named newfile
:12,35w smallfile<Return> write the contents of the lines numbered 12 through 35 to a new file named smallfile
:w! prevfile<Return> write current contents over a pre-existing file named prevfile

<customer-name><environment><city><physical/virtual><function><number>
Field1: customer name is 3-4 characters. oss (for internal), ms (Microsoft) etc
Feild2: environment (dev/tst/etc) is 3 characters. This is omitted on 'production' servers.
Field3: city is 3 characters (MEL, BRI, SYD)
Field4: physical/virtual is one character (p or v)
Field5: function is 2-5 characters
Field6: Number is 2 characters

Ecample:
osssydvdc01
msmelvdc02

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